Category Archives: Planning

What the KiDEx CEO Says

TRANSIT has gone on record with our objections to the Kinrara-Damansara expressway. Our reasoning, expressed here, focuses on the inherent efficiency of public transport as compared to elevated highways as well as the huge social and economic impacts of the highway.

But we always want to give you the opportunity to hear both sides of the story, so we present to you the following:

First, a podcast from BFM Radio in which the CEO comments on public transport. Second, an article in which the KiDEx CEO argues that the projection of 3.9 million cars on Malaysian roads by 2025 makes more highways necessary.

Finally we have comments from the CEO on our page, followed by our response.

Continue reading What the KiDEx CEO Says

Meanwhile in JB, urban buses are moved out of the city centre starting May 1

TRANSIT took note of the following article describing changes to bus service in Johor Baru, with a new “no pick up” order for Jalan Wong Ah Fook, diversion of urban stage buses to Larkin Sentral, and a new free shuttle bus connecting the two areas.

Commuters get short end of stick

(NST JOHOR, 1 May 2014)

JOHOR Baru City Council has come up with a solution to the the problem of traffic congestion in Jalan Wong Ah Fook, which it believes is caused by the long queue of stage buses waiting for passengers.

The council recently announced that effective May 1, all stage buses plying the northwest route, which is basically the Skudai corridor, may only drop off passengers by the road. They will not be allowed to pick up passengers.

Continue reading Meanwhile in JB, urban buses are moved out of the city centre starting May 1

Haphazard halts are a sign of haphazard planning and policy and organization and management….and especially leadership.

TRANSIT took note of this article in the Star Metro which reminded us how much more needs to be done to improve public transport organization and management in the Klang Valley.

Haphazard halts (The Star Metro,  29 April 2014)

MORE often than not, public buses in the Klang Valley can be seen stopping to pick up passengers willy-nilly, be it by the roadside, along a flyover or even at the junction of a busy main road.

The lack of a proper bus stop or lay-by, does not seem to faze the drivers and the practise has been going on for years.

However, their actions not only contribute to traffic congestion but also pose a threat to life and limb as passengers scramble to board the bus on a busy road.

Continue reading Haphazard halts are a sign of haphazard planning and policy and organization and management….and especially leadership.

Meanwhile in Ipoh…After a few missteps on public transport Ipoh Council begins a move forward

TRANSIT took note of this news from Ipoh, where Ipoh City Council is looking to reorganize and improve its focus on public transport services. As is typical we see bluster and calls for enforcement but little about the structural problems within the public transport industry.

Ipoh Council to ensure public service vehicles are better organized (The Star, 22 April 2014)
Ipoh Council to ensure public service vehicles are better organised

BY TOON KIT YI

THE Ipoh City Council has been given the green light to enforce the Land Public Transport Act 2010 to ensure a properly managed public transport system in the city.

Continue reading Meanwhile in Ipoh…After a few missteps on public transport Ipoh Council begins a move forward

This proposed expressway should be Petaling Jaya’s LRT or MRT line!

[Admin; TRANSIT has long objected to the proposed Kinrara Damansara Expressway, as you can see from this draft post which we created 2 years ago]

TRANSIT took note of the proposal to build an elevated expressway through the heart of Petaling Jaya.

TRANSIT opposes the expressway proposal and strongly recommends that the corridor be used to build a north-south rapid transit corridor, likely a monorail or LRT line. We expect that this would cost the same or less than the proposed expressway, occupy less visual space and obviously would not bring pollution on site.

Image showing the alignment of the Kinrara-Damansara expressway, proposed in Budget 2011.

As public transportation this corridor would connect with 4 public transport corridors (either existing/under construction)…the existing KTM Komuter line in PJ Old Town, the Kelana Jaya LRT Line at Taman Jaya, and the LRT extension in Kinrara and the MRT Line, both currently under construction. There is also the proposed Federal Highway Bus Rapid Transit corridor.

This has far greater connection potential than an expressway and will move 10 times as many people.

TRANSIT Says:

We see that cities across the world are in the process of taking down elevated expressways and improving their urban realms…while we in Malaysia are unfortunately looking at building more.

We have an opportunity here to build a lasting legacy for public transportation in Petaling Jaya…let’s not mess this up.

Selangor Government makes unwise decision to proceed with study of elevated highway through Petaling Jaya

TRANSIT took note of the unfortunate news that the Selangor Government will move ahead with studies for the Kinrara Damansara Expressway, also known as KiDEx or the KiDEx “skyway” (a falsely romanticized name just as false as the pictures on their website)

Selangor approves studies on plan for elevated highway, KiDEx (The Malay Mail, 11 April 2014)

The Selangor state government has approved studies to be conducted on the controversial Kinrara-Damansara Expressway (KIDEX) project, Tan Sri Khalid Ibrahim said today.

The Selangor mentri besar also said that public hearings will be held once the studies are completed.

The project has come under heavy criticism from residents worried about pollution and the lack of publicly available details.

TRANSIT Says:

Continue reading Selangor Government makes unwise decision to proceed with study of elevated highway through Petaling Jaya

ADUNs in Petaling Jaya call for PJ LRT instead of proposed Kinrara Damansara Expressway

Transit took note of the proposal from 4 ADUN in the Selangor State Assembly (representing Petaling Jaya) that the route of the proposed Kinrara Damansara Expressway (a.k.a. “KiDex” or “KIDEX Skyway“) would be better utilized for public transportation.

Image of proposed Rapid Transit (orange) in KiDex corridor (blue)

Continue reading ADUNs in Petaling Jaya call for PJ LRT instead of proposed Kinrara Damansara Expressway

KL to face gridlock in 3 years? Not exactly says TRANSIT

‘Gridlock’ is one of those scary terms thrown out to suggest fear in the minds of the public. ‘Gridlock’ suggests a complete vehicle immobility … created when too many vehicles attempt to move on the same roads at the same time.

And for the average Malaysian driver or public transport user, who regularly experiences the unpredictable slow movement and traffic jams that plague life in the larger Malaysian cities, ‘gridlock’ is an appropriate term to describe traffic that just gets worse and worse.

But we do not have ‘gridlock’ in the Klang Valley. We do not have gridlock in Penang or Johor Baru or Ipoh or any of the other big cities … simply because these cities do not have grids.

We’re not being facetious or uncaring here. We recognize that Malaysian cities have a massive problem of overwhelming traffic congestion. After all this is one of the reasons why TRANSIT exists.

But while congestion is stressful and has horrible social and economic costs, it is not ‘gridlock’ as TRANSIT knows the term. Vehicles move, albeit very, very slowly…sometimes after waiting for a very long time.

What this reveals to us is simple: We do not have a ‘gridlock’ problem on our roads. We have a traffic congestion problem caused by high traffic volumes, too many Single Occupant Vehicles (those SOV’s!), and bad driving behaviour caused by poor driver training.

Lousy urban and transport planning which makes driving necessary *and* funnels too many cars onto the roads is also to blame … and let’s not forget the ineffective public transport services which will never be a solution for many because they appear to offer the most basic of services to an undervalued “captive” ridership market.

To borrow an analogy, we often describe roads as our urban “arteries.” Well in KL and Malaysian cities we have lots of “arteries” but they are blocked by plaque (the bottlenecks and bad spots) made worse by cholesterol (dumb ideas and behaviours that create those “plaques”).

Have you ever wondered why certain drivers just appear to be very stupid (careless/reckless/dangerous etc…choose your own term)? Those stupid behaviours are the source of the plaque on our roads…the reason why there are jams without collisions and why good drivers feel like they have to be aggressive, reckless and offensive in order to survive…and why our roads and highways are so very unsafe.

So when you see articles like the one below, promising ‘gridlock’ if nothing is done, remember the following points:

1. There is no ‘gridlock’ on our roads only congestion caused by high traffic volumes, badly designed roads and poorly trained drivers.

2. We do not necessarily need costly mega-projects to find solutions for congestion. Instead we need to educate ourselves and become smarter at what we do.

3. Fear is used as a tool to generate compliance.

4. Threats and warnings are often a sign of weakness. In the case of government, this means a lack of policy alternatives or effective solutions.

http://www.themalaymailonline.com/malaysia/article/kl-to-face-gridlock-in-three-years

TRANSIT Says:

Remember to think for yourself.

MRT Update: Ho Chin Soon research statement speculates on route of MRT Circle Line

TRANSIT took note of this interesting information courtesy of a research statement produced in 2011 by Ho Chin Soon company.

The map below shows Ho Chin Soon’s anticipated route for the MRT Line 2 (Circle Line), which is somewhat different from the MMC-Gamuda proposal.

Ho Chin Soon speculates on the route of the MRT Circle Line. Image courtesy of Ho Chin Soon via @Nazrey

Click here for a larger version of the image above.

TRANSIT Says

We are not endorsing Ho Chin Soon’s anticipated route for the MRT. We just wonder how feasible it is compared to the Gamuda MRT proposal, but then both lines have their advantages and challenges.

What do you think of the Ho Chin Soon MRT proposal?

Why is the MPK using the North Klang bus terminal for a night market, instead of a bus terminal? And why hasn’t the Selangor Government stepped in?

TRANSIT took note of this interesting and disturbing article about the introduction of a night market at the site of the old North Klang bus terminal, which was closed in late 2007 when Klang Sentral was opened.

The irony, of course, is that the bus area remains closed to buses – despite the fact that most buses that serve Klang town have returned to the North Klang bus terminal area, and Klang residents have called on the MPK to improve amenities and facilities.

What makes it worse is that in 4 years, the Selangor government has not stepped in to improve public transport in Klang, reopening the North Klang bus terminal and introducing new services. In addition, SPAD has not stepped in and resolved the issue, despite entreaties from TRANSIT, who recommended to SPAD that solving the Klang Sentral and North Klang bus terminal issues was the best place for them to get started.

The resolution of the North Klang bus terminal issue is going to be a major factor in any improvement to public transport in the west Klang Valley.

Flea market draws flak (The Star)

Saturday February 18, 2012
Story and photos by ELAN PERUMAL
elan@thestar.com.my

THE Klang Municipal Council’s decision to approve the Nadi Kota Uptown flea market at the site of the former North Klang bus terminal has not gone down well with traders in the area.

The North Klang bus terminal remains closed, but buses and passengers still gather on Jalan Pos. Image courtesy of The Star.

They feel that the council’s decision to approve the market which operates from 10pm to 4am daily is not a good idea.

The traders said this was because the bus terminal issue had not been resolved yet after the move to Klang Sentral in Meru four years ago. Continue reading Why is the MPK using the North Klang bus terminal for a night market, instead of a bus terminal? And why hasn’t the Selangor Government stepped in?