Category Archives: Community Shuttle Bus

Meanwhile in JB, urban buses are moved out of the city centre starting May 1

TRANSIT took note of the following article describing changes to bus service in Johor Baru, with a new “no pick up” order for Jalan Wong Ah Fook, diversion of urban stage buses to Larkin Sentral, and a new free shuttle bus connecting the two areas.

Commuters get short end of stick

(NST JOHOR, 1 May 2014)

JOHOR Baru City Council has come up with a solution to the the problem of traffic congestion in Jalan Wong Ah Fook, which it believes is caused by the long queue of stage buses waiting for passengers.

The council recently announced that effective May 1, all stage buses plying the northwest route, which is basically the Skudai corridor, may only drop off passengers by the road. They will not be allowed to pick up passengers.

Continue reading Meanwhile in JB, urban buses are moved out of the city centre starting May 1

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Haphazard halts are a sign of haphazard planning and policy and organization and management….and especially leadership.

TRANSIT took note of this article in the Star Metro which reminded us how much more needs to be done to improve public transport organization and management in the Klang Valley.

Haphazard halts (The Star Metro,  29 April 2014)

MORE often than not, public buses in the Klang Valley can be seen stopping to pick up passengers willy-nilly, be it by the roadside, along a flyover or even at the junction of a busy main road.

The lack of a proper bus stop or lay-by, does not seem to faze the drivers and the practise has been going on for years.

However, their actions not only contribute to traffic congestion but also pose a threat to life and limb as passengers scramble to board the bus on a busy road.

Continue reading Haphazard halts are a sign of haphazard planning and policy and organization and management….and especially leadership.

How do we resolve parking and congestion problems in the city centre? By building better alternatives to driving (Update #1)

The worst cities in the world for parking, according to IBM. Image & data courtesy of IBM.

Our original post:

For 5 years and in fact, many more, the members of TRANSIT have been talking about improving public transportation to bring flexibility to our communities.

We recognize the importance of the car, but unlike others, we recognize that our communities do not have to be totally dependent on the car as our only means of getting around.

That is why we at TRANSIT have continuously called for better, more reliable public transport – buses, trains and LRT – to give the public reliable alternatives.

The problem is that the focus of the government and authorities has been on building more LRT or MRT. Yet they forget that a majority of public transport users get to KL via buses – and the fastest, easiest way to get more people to use public transport is to make buses more reliable, faster, and more efficient.

This would encourage the public to use public transport, rather than attempting to drive into the city – creating unnecessary pressure on our roads, an artificial shortage of parking spaces, and a pointless and wasteful use of precious space in our city centre for the storage of cars.

Parking blues in city centre (NST)
24 February 2012
By Bhavani Krishna Iyer

CONVENIENT and affordable parking is welcome in any city and, in this respect, Kuala Lumpur fails us miserably. Continue reading How do we resolve parking and congestion problems in the city centre? By building better alternatives to driving (Update #1)

Why is the MPK using the North Klang bus terminal for a night market, instead of a bus terminal? And why hasn’t the Selangor Government stepped in?

TRANSIT took note of this interesting and disturbing article about the introduction of a night market at the site of the old North Klang bus terminal, which was closed in late 2007 when Klang Sentral was opened.

The irony, of course, is that the bus area remains closed to buses – despite the fact that most buses that serve Klang town have returned to the North Klang bus terminal area, and Klang residents have called on the MPK to improve amenities and facilities.

What makes it worse is that in 4 years, the Selangor government has not stepped in to improve public transport in Klang, reopening the North Klang bus terminal and introducing new services. In addition, SPAD has not stepped in and resolved the issue, despite entreaties from TRANSIT, who recommended to SPAD that solving the Klang Sentral and North Klang bus terminal issues was the best place for them to get started.

The resolution of the North Klang bus terminal issue is going to be a major factor in any improvement to public transport in the west Klang Valley.

Flea market draws flak (The Star)

Saturday February 18, 2012
Story and photos by ELAN PERUMAL
elan@thestar.com.my

THE Klang Municipal Council’s decision to approve the Nadi Kota Uptown flea market at the site of the former North Klang bus terminal has not gone down well with traders in the area.

The North Klang bus terminal remains closed, but buses and passengers still gather on Jalan Pos. Image courtesy of The Star.

They feel that the council’s decision to approve the market which operates from 10pm to 4am daily is not a good idea.

The traders said this was because the bus terminal issue had not been resolved yet after the move to Klang Sentral in Meru four years ago. Continue reading Why is the MPK using the North Klang bus terminal for a night market, instead of a bus terminal? And why hasn’t the Selangor Government stepped in?

Bus-Rapid Transit plan and water taxis for Petaling Jaya?

TRANSIT took note of this interesting piece of information from the Selangor Times – a plan for “Rapid Transit Bus” routes, minibus services and limited-stop bus routes in Petaling Jaya.

Selangor Times diagram showing proposals for public transport in Petaling Jaya.

Click here for a larger version of the image above. The February 3, 2012 issue of Selangor Times can be seen here in the scribd feed.

The proposed line would run from a bus terminal in SS7 (near the proposed SS7 LRT station?) to the bus terminal in Damansara Damai, running via Subang Airport Road, Jalan Sg. Buloh and Jalan Kuala Selangor. Whether or not the line can be considered as “Bus Rapid Transit” (or another name for Bus Expressway Transit or Expressway Rapid Transit) remains to be seen – after all, we (indeed, the public in general) have to look at the details of the plan.

According to this article in the Selangor Times, “Water taxis in PJ by 2015?” boats and hovercrafts will also ferry passengers from jetties built along Sungai Damansara, Sungai  Kayu Ara, Sungai Penchala, Sungai Tambul and Sungai Payong.

Seriously? As great (well, “creative”) as all these ideas are, we would like to see the MBPJ take the steps to improve public transport first – like setting up a public transport / urban transport office to determine how realistic and feasible these plans are.

Then, engage with the public to set up a MBPJ transport council to discuss these proposals, and implement actual public consultation to see if the public actually want these proposed services.

Finally, figure out how to run the service in a way that actually works and get people to use public transport.

3-day LRT extension programme open day at Sunway Pyramid this weekend

TRANSIT took note of this interesting article which discusses the Open Day that Prasarana is holding to share information about the LRT Extension Programme Open Day which will inform the public about the Ampang & Kelana Jaya LRT extension plans.

300 lucky visitors to get free MyRapid cards at three-day LEP Open Day (The Star)
February 9, 2012
By ISABELLE LAI
isabellelai@thestar.com.my

PETALING JAYA: Three hundred lucky visitors will receive free MyRapid cards during the Klang Valley’s LRT Line Extension Project (LEP) Open Day this weekend.

LEP project and asset owner, Syarikat Prasarana Negara Bhd, will be giving out 10 cards hourly at its booth, totalling 100 cards daily from Feb 10 to 12.

Prasarana group managing director Datuk Shahril Mokhtar said the MyRapid cards, currently used by commuters taking the Kelana Jaya and Ampang lines, would be given out as a gesture to thank its customers for supporting the LEP. Continue reading 3-day LRT extension programme open day at Sunway Pyramid this weekend

‘Solutions’ to public transport problems focusing on the bus industry, not public transport users

By now everyone should be aware that a major crisis is taking place in the bus industry.

The shut down of CityLiner bus services throughout was the major ‘tipping pint’ in a series of crises [TRANSIT: refer to our “No Bus for You” series of posts] that showed the precarious state of public transport and the bus industry – and made it clear that SPAD has lost the plot by focusing on the MRT project rather than revamping & transforming public transport.

The nation-wide collapse of bus services are continuing, despite the recent announcement that the Malaysian Government has approved an RM400mn fund for public transport operators. Applications for this fund began earlier this week and SPAD intends to release the first Rm100mn as soon as possible.

TRANSIT notes that the government is stepping in with the financial aid to bus operators. We also note that Prasarana-RapidKL have talked about improving cooperation (actually, we should say “starting” cooperation) with private bus operators to reduce wasteful competition on different routes. At the same time, taxi drivers and other bus companies are benefiting from the lack of competition in the Klang area since CityLiner shut down bus services, affecting thousands of public transport users.

However, we need the government, SPAD and Prasarana-RapidKL to acknowledge that their “solutions” are not holistic and not sustainable. The problem is that they are focusing on short-term solutions for the crisis, not long-term solutions that will make public transport work, sustainably and effectively, and most importantly, meet the needs of public transport users.

And this, ladies & gentlemen, is the biggest problem. Everyone talks about fixing public transport but all the solutions that are put forward focus on the bus industry, rather than the public transport service. What’s worse is that the ‘solutions’ still fail to consider the needs of the public transport users.

Read about TRANSIT’s take on the issues and a proposed action plan after the jump! Continue reading ‘Solutions’ to public transport problems focusing on the bus industry, not public transport users

TRANSIT says goodbye to 2011 and wishes everyone a happy 2012

The year 2011 has been quite tumultuous for public transport and indeed, for many people in many places throughout the world.

Specifically to public transport, we in Malaysia have seen a number of major changes. Continue reading TRANSIT says goodbye to 2011 and wishes everyone a happy 2012

SPAD has new permit system on the way … re-register by 31 December 2011 or the party is over.

TRANSIT took note of the following article, which is a final update on the permit re-registration process that SPAD has undertaken in Peninsular Malaysia since the beginning of April 2011.

The window for the permit re-registration was from April until 30 September 2011, but many people did not re-register in time.

SPAD is now saying that all permits that have not been re-registered with SPAD as of 31 December 2011 will be revoked (hopefully as of 1 January 2012).

Register or lose licence, warns SPAD (The Star)
15 December 2011

By WANI MUTHIAH
wani@thestar.com.my

PETALING JAYA: The licences of public and commercial vehicles which have not been re-registered with the Land Public Transport Commission (SPAD) by Dec 31 will be revoked.

SPAD chief operating officer Azahar Ahmad said the owners and operators of the vehicles will then have to re-apply all over again. Continue reading SPAD has new permit system on the way … re-register by 31 December 2011 or the party is over.

Move forwards, not backwards to solve our public transport crisis (Update #1)

Update: Azmi Sharom wants you to buzz your rep on the bus issue!

TRANSIT has taken note of the following letters in the newspapers regarding the public transport crisis – suggesting that the crisis could be resolved with the introduction of van services and owner-operated minibuses.

While TRANSIT appreciates the suggestions, and appreciate that vans and minibuses still have a role in our public transport mix, we do not believe that vans and minibuses by themselves are an effective solution for our public transport problems. Unregulated vans & minibuses cannot replace stage buses, have created problems in the past (and will likely create more problems in the future), and do not resolve the fundamental problems in the industry – a lack of organization & leadership.

The articles (in full) and comments from TRANSIT can be found after the jump…

Continue reading Move forwards, not backwards to solve our public transport crisis (Update #1)