Category Archives: Transit-Oriented Development

Will unilateral approval of KiDEx fracture the Selangor Government?

TRANSIT took note of the increasingly public disagreement within the Selangor Government about the prioritization of the Kinrara-Damansara expressway also known as the KiDEx ” skyway.”

4 ADUNs from Petaling Jaya have already expressed their opposition to the approval of the expressway and called for greater transparency and suggested that the corridor would be better used for public transport. There is a public group of residents expressing their concerns. Azman Ali, a member of the government and a challenger for Menteri Besar, has also expressed his dismay at the project saying that the government was putting the cart before the horse.

In response the Menteri Besar has said that not building the highway would be unfair to the developer.

Continue reading Will unilateral approval of KiDEx fracture the Selangor Government?

Meanwhile in JB, urban buses are moved out of the city centre starting May 1

TRANSIT took note of the following article describing changes to bus service in Johor Baru, with a new “no pick up” order for Jalan Wong Ah Fook, diversion of urban stage buses to Larkin Sentral, and a new free shuttle bus connecting the two areas.

Commuters get short end of stick

(NST JOHOR, 1 May 2014)

JOHOR Baru City Council has come up with a solution to the the problem of traffic congestion in Jalan Wong Ah Fook, which it believes is caused by the long queue of stage buses waiting for passengers.

The council recently announced that effective May 1, all stage buses plying the northwest route, which is basically the Skudai corridor, may only drop off passengers by the road. They will not be allowed to pick up passengers.

Continue reading Meanwhile in JB, urban buses are moved out of the city centre starting May 1

Meanwhile in Ipoh…After a few missteps on public transport Ipoh Council begins a move forward

TRANSIT took note of this news from Ipoh, where Ipoh City Council is looking to reorganize and improve its focus on public transport services. As is typical we see bluster and calls for enforcement but little about the structural problems within the public transport industry.

Ipoh Council to ensure public service vehicles are better organized (The Star, 22 April 2014)
Ipoh Council to ensure public service vehicles are better organised

BY TOON KIT YI

THE Ipoh City Council has been given the green light to enforce the Land Public Transport Act 2010 to ensure a properly managed public transport system in the city.

Continue reading Meanwhile in Ipoh…After a few missteps on public transport Ipoh Council begins a move forward

Interesting book talks about elevated walkways in Hong Kong

TRANSIT took note of this very interesting book Hong Kong: City Without Ground which looks closely at the (mostly private) elevated wallway network in Hong Kong.

The article from The Atlantic Cities (excallent graphics and related comments) is linked below.

http://theatlanticcities.com/design/2012/08/hong-kong-city-without-ground/3000/

TRANSIT Says:

Proposals for elevated walkways in Kuala Lumpur often use the walkway network in Hong Kong as an examplar.

The walkways in Hong Kong … with outdoor and indoor connections … was built as a result of crowding on the narrow streets of Hong Kong Island especially in the Central and Wan Chai districts. This network was extended further west and east as development increased, and is being supplemented by elevated walkways in West and East Kowloon.

We cannot simply import technology or ideas from other places without adapting them to the challenges that we face in Kuala Lumpur…and in order to understand these ideas then we need to learn as much about them as possible.

A walkway network for Kuala Lumpur is an important addition to the pedestrian realm but should not be used in place of a real network of pedestrian places at street level…and must be supported by efforts to maintain safety and security.

TRANSIT invites our readers to view the links above and comment below about walkways and pedestrian places in Kuala Lumpur and Malaysia.

First 2 of 4 car monorail train sets to begin service in August 2014

TRANSIT took note of the announcement from Prasarana that 4 car service on the KL Monorail is expected to begin in August of 2014. All 12 trains are expected to be in service by September 2015.

Video

KL Monorail’s new four-car train to start operation in August (The Star, 9 April 2014)

This comes after the first two trains were delivered by Scomi Rail in Rawang to the depot in Brickfields for testing and commissioning in late January of 2014
New four car monorail trains arrive at depot (The Star, 25 January 2014)

The new 4 carriage trains can carry 430 passengers and will have space for wheelchairs. The monorail stations are being retrofitted with chair lifts (presumably the ones that attach to stairways? Or proper lifts?) and work is expected to be finished soon.

TRANSIT Says:

As you can imagine, we are pleased to see improvements to our public transport services…even incremental ones. The KL Monorail is already a decade old and was horribly over capacity in 2005…so the new carriages are a welcome addition.

Indeed, seeing 4-carriage monorail trains may help raise public confidence that the monorail can be more than just a “toy train” and there may be demand for applications of monorail technology in other cities in the Klang Valley, such as Petaling Jaya in place of the proposed Kinrara Damansara Expressway. TRANSIT has long said that the Sunway BRT line with its RM100 million per km cost, might have been better as a monorail … and could have been extended to connect to the Kelana Jaya LRT Line at Kelana Jaya and the Ampang LRT Line at Puchong.

While the 7 month period of testing and commissioning is a bit of a surprise, we expect that this is also related to the re signalling of the monorail system which will allow for faster train movements.

Overall TRANSIT is pleased but will reserve final judgment until we ride the new trains.

ADUNs in Petaling Jaya call for PJ LRT instead of proposed Kinrara Damansara Expressway

Transit took note of the proposal from 4 ADUN in the Selangor State Assembly (representing Petaling Jaya) that the route of the proposed Kinrara Damansara Expressway (a.k.a. “KiDex” or “KIDEX Skyway“) would be better utilized for public transportation.

Image of proposed Rapid Transit (orange) in KiDex corridor (blue)

Continue reading ADUNs in Petaling Jaya call for PJ LRT instead of proposed Kinrara Damansara Expressway

How do we resolve parking and congestion problems in the city centre? By building better alternatives to driving (Update #1)

The worst cities in the world for parking, according to IBM. Image & data courtesy of IBM.

Our original post:

For 5 years and in fact, many more, the members of TRANSIT have been talking about improving public transportation to bring flexibility to our communities.

We recognize the importance of the car, but unlike others, we recognize that our communities do not have to be totally dependent on the car as our only means of getting around.

That is why we at TRANSIT have continuously called for better, more reliable public transport – buses, trains and LRT – to give the public reliable alternatives.

The problem is that the focus of the government and authorities has been on building more LRT or MRT. Yet they forget that a majority of public transport users get to KL via buses – and the fastest, easiest way to get more people to use public transport is to make buses more reliable, faster, and more efficient.

This would encourage the public to use public transport, rather than attempting to drive into the city – creating unnecessary pressure on our roads, an artificial shortage of parking spaces, and a pointless and wasteful use of precious space in our city centre for the storage of cars.

Parking blues in city centre (NST)
24 February 2012
By Bhavani Krishna Iyer

CONVENIENT and affordable parking is welcome in any city and, in this respect, Kuala Lumpur fails us miserably. Continue reading How do we resolve parking and congestion problems in the city centre? By building better alternatives to driving (Update #1)

MRT Update: Ho Chin Soon research statement speculates on route of MRT Circle Line

TRANSIT took note of this interesting information courtesy of a research statement produced in 2011 by Ho Chin Soon company.

The map below shows Ho Chin Soon’s anticipated route for the MRT Line 2 (Circle Line), which is somewhat different from the MMC-Gamuda proposal.

Ho Chin Soon speculates on the route of the MRT Circle Line. Image courtesy of Ho Chin Soon via @Nazrey

Click here for a larger version of the image above.

TRANSIT Says

We are not endorsing Ho Chin Soon’s anticipated route for the MRT. We just wonder how feasible it is compared to the Gamuda MRT proposal, but then both lines have their advantages and challenges.

What do you think of the Ho Chin Soon MRT proposal?

30% of Malaysian bus drivers suffer from sleep disorders, says survey

TRANSIT members were shocked and disappointed to read the news in The Star today, which shared the results of a survey by the Sleep Disorder Society of Malaysia and the JKJR which showed that a significant number of Malaysian bus drivers suffer from sleep disorders.

30% of M’sian bus drivers suffer from sleep disorders (The Star)
Saturday February 18, 2012

KUALA LUMPUR: Sleeping disorders affect 30 percent of 300 bus drivers in the country, with eight percent categorised as chronic, raising fears about their driving performance.

Sleep Disorder Society Malaysia (SDSM) president Dr Muhammad Muhsin Ahmad Zahari said the statistics were obtained in a joint study with the Road Safety Department (JKJR) recently.

“The survey was carried out on 300 bus drivers from five transport companies nationwide and what shocked us the most was that eight percent are at a severe level,” he told Bernama at the Sleep Disorder Society Malaysia (SDSM) Scientific Meeting – Towards Healthier Sleep in Malaysia event, here on Saturday.

[TRANSIT: We want to know which companies!]
Continue reading 30% of Malaysian bus drivers suffer from sleep disorders, says survey

Why is the MPK using the North Klang bus terminal for a night market, instead of a bus terminal? And why hasn’t the Selangor Government stepped in?

TRANSIT took note of this interesting and disturbing article about the introduction of a night market at the site of the old North Klang bus terminal, which was closed in late 2007 when Klang Sentral was opened.

The irony, of course, is that the bus area remains closed to buses – despite the fact that most buses that serve Klang town have returned to the North Klang bus terminal area, and Klang residents have called on the MPK to improve amenities and facilities.

What makes it worse is that in 4 years, the Selangor government has not stepped in to improve public transport in Klang, reopening the North Klang bus terminal and introducing new services. In addition, SPAD has not stepped in and resolved the issue, despite entreaties from TRANSIT, who recommended to SPAD that solving the Klang Sentral and North Klang bus terminal issues was the best place for them to get started.

The resolution of the North Klang bus terminal issue is going to be a major factor in any improvement to public transport in the west Klang Valley.

Flea market draws flak (The Star)

Saturday February 18, 2012
Story and photos by ELAN PERUMAL
elan@thestar.com.my

THE Klang Municipal Council’s decision to approve the Nadi Kota Uptown flea market at the site of the former North Klang bus terminal has not gone down well with traders in the area.

The North Klang bus terminal remains closed, but buses and passengers still gather on Jalan Pos. Image courtesy of The Star.

They feel that the council’s decision to approve the market which operates from 10pm to 4am daily is not a good idea.

The traders said this was because the bus terminal issue had not been resolved yet after the move to Klang Sentral in Meru four years ago. Continue reading Why is the MPK using the North Klang bus terminal for a night market, instead of a bus terminal? And why hasn’t the Selangor Government stepped in?