Category Archives: Pedestrianisation

Haphazard halts are a sign of haphazard planning and policy and organization and management….and especially leadership.

TRANSIT took note of this article in the Star Metro which reminded us how much more needs to be done to improve public transport organization and management in the Klang Valley.

Haphazard halts (The Star Metro,  29 April 2014)

MORE often than not, public buses in the Klang Valley can be seen stopping to pick up passengers willy-nilly, be it by the roadside, along a flyover or even at the junction of a busy main road.

The lack of a proper bus stop or lay-by, does not seem to faze the drivers and the practise has been going on for years.

However, their actions not only contribute to traffic congestion but also pose a threat to life and limb as passengers scramble to board the bus on a busy road.

Continue reading Haphazard halts are a sign of haphazard planning and policy and organization and management….and especially leadership.

Advertisements

Interesting book talks about elevated walkways in Hong Kong

TRANSIT took note of this very interesting book Hong Kong: City Without Ground which looks closely at the (mostly private) elevated wallway network in Hong Kong.

The article from The Atlantic Cities (excallent graphics and related comments) is linked below.

http://theatlanticcities.com/design/2012/08/hong-kong-city-without-ground/3000/

TRANSIT Says:

Proposals for elevated walkways in Kuala Lumpur often use the walkway network in Hong Kong as an examplar.

The walkways in Hong Kong … with outdoor and indoor connections … was built as a result of crowding on the narrow streets of Hong Kong Island especially in the Central and Wan Chai districts. This network was extended further west and east as development increased, and is being supplemented by elevated walkways in West and East Kowloon.

We cannot simply import technology or ideas from other places without adapting them to the challenges that we face in Kuala Lumpur…and in order to understand these ideas then we need to learn as much about them as possible.

A walkway network for Kuala Lumpur is an important addition to the pedestrian realm but should not be used in place of a real network of pedestrian places at street level…and must be supported by efforts to maintain safety and security.

TRANSIT invites our readers to view the links above and comment below about walkways and pedestrian places in Kuala Lumpur and Malaysia.

How do we resolve parking and congestion problems in the city centre? By building better alternatives to driving (Update #1)

The worst cities in the world for parking, according to IBM. Image & data courtesy of IBM.

Our original post:

For 5 years and in fact, many more, the members of TRANSIT have been talking about improving public transportation to bring flexibility to our communities.

We recognize the importance of the car, but unlike others, we recognize that our communities do not have to be totally dependent on the car as our only means of getting around.

That is why we at TRANSIT have continuously called for better, more reliable public transport – buses, trains and LRT – to give the public reliable alternatives.

The problem is that the focus of the government and authorities has been on building more LRT or MRT. Yet they forget that a majority of public transport users get to KL via buses – and the fastest, easiest way to get more people to use public transport is to make buses more reliable, faster, and more efficient.

This would encourage the public to use public transport, rather than attempting to drive into the city – creating unnecessary pressure on our roads, an artificial shortage of parking spaces, and a pointless and wasteful use of precious space in our city centre for the storage of cars.

Parking blues in city centre (NST)
24 February 2012
By Bhavani Krishna Iyer

CONVENIENT and affordable parking is welcome in any city and, in this respect, Kuala Lumpur fails us miserably. Continue reading How do we resolve parking and congestion problems in the city centre? By building better alternatives to driving (Update #1)

Penang expands car-free Sundays in George Town

TRANSIT took note of this article announcing the expansion of car-free Sundays in the central business district of George Town.

This initiative of the Penang Government and MPPP will likely be well-received by most residents of the area as well as visitors.

We hope to see more people using public transportation to get to the Central Business District to enjoy the car-free spaces in a carefree manner.

Ban’s on every Sunday (The Star)
Saturday December 10, 2011
>By KIATISAK CHUA

DRIVERS and motorcyclists heading towards George Town’s Central Business District on Sunday from now onwards should take note that certain stretches of roads will be cordoned off from 7am to 5pm in conjunction with ‘Car Free Day’.

The affected roads are parts of Beach Street, Bishop Street, Church Street, and the whole of Church Street Ghaut which runs from Weld Quay to Beach Street. Continue reading Penang expands car-free Sundays in George Town

Brickfields on ‘collision course’ because of the new bus & taxi lane?

On December 3rd, 2001, buses & taxis leaving KL on the southbound route through Brickfields began using the contra-flow bus & taxi lane on Jalan Tun Sambanthan.

The bus & taxi lane was actually supposed to begin operations on 20th August 2011 but the start was delayed because of objections from business owners in the area who complained that not having car-parks in front of their shops would somehow cause them to lose business.

Now that operations along the bus & taxi lane have started, business owners are actively protesting.

In addition, there is a lot of confusion over what is happening in the area. While the NST claimed that things were going smoothly for buses & taxis, The Star reported traffic chaos. There have been a number of collisions between motorists and, even more disturbing, a number of collisions between pedestrians and buses! A RapidKL bus driver has been suspended pending an internal investigation related to one crash – the aftermath of which resulted in a hostile crowd and vandalising of the bus.

A Metrobus leads a RapidKL through the new contra-flow bus & taxi lane in Brickfields, Kuala Lumpur. The lane allows buses to travel southbound on Jalan Tun Sambanthan. Image courtesy of the NST.

Even worse, it appears that some politicians are getting involved, possibly there to stroke frustrations in order to enjoy a more populist appeal before the upcoming election!

As if the congestion & traffic in Brickfields was not bad enough????

Give new system a chance, public urged (The Star – Metro)
Saturday December 10, 2011
By BAVANI M
bavanim@thestar.com.my

THE residents and traders of Little India in Brickfields should give the newly-introduced bus and taxi lane system a chance before dismissing it as non-workable, said Federal Territory People’s Progressive Party chairman Datuk A. Chandra-kumanan.

“Whatever rules and policies implemented by the government has been carried out in accordance with the wishes of the people and for it to work you need to give it time,’’ he said.

Chandrakumanan, who made a working visit to Brickfields on Tuesday, said he decided to see for himself what was happening after receiving complaints from the public.

Showing the way: A DBKL enforcement officer guiding traffic in Brickfields. Photo by RICKY LAI for The Star.

Continue reading Brickfields on ‘collision course’ because of the new bus & taxi lane?

Now you know why we will always have traffic congestion in KL – because we widen roads to allow cars to block them!

TRANSIT took note of this absurd piece of news where the KL government will be spending lots of your RM to widen Jalan Ma’rof in Bangsar, in the area between Jalan Bangsar (where the flyover to/from MidValley is) and Jalan Ara (where the Masjid is).

Why is the government widening only this section of the road? Because this is the area where there is a great deal of congestion caused by taxis that queue up to fill-up with Natural Gas at the Petronas station between Jalan Riong & Jalan Tempinis.

Taxis lining up to fill up natural gas at a petrol station in Jalan Maarof, and causing a bottleneck. Pic by Syarafiq Abd Samad, New Straits Times.

The Petronas station in Bangsar is the only NGV facility in the south side of KL, and the daily queues are a source of frustration for residents, neighbours and taxi drivers alike.

But instead of solving the problem by having Petronas build more NGV filling stations – or even a centralized multi-level filling station in the nearby Tenaga Nasional lands, the DBKL government has decided to widen the road so taxis can queue up.

Jalan Maarof in Bangsar to be widened to three lanes to ease congestion (The Star)
Saturday November 26, 2011

By FAZLEENA AZIZ
fazleena@thestar.com.my

KUALA Lumpur mayor Tan Sri Ahmad Fuad Ismail has briefed residents associations and stakeholdwers in Bangsar on the upgrading of Jalan Maarof to ease traffic congestion.

Jalan Maarof will be upgraded from the Jalan Bangsar junction to Jalan Ara near the Masjid Saidina Abu Bakar As Siddiq. Continue reading Now you know why we will always have traffic congestion in KL – because we widen roads to allow cars to block them!

International Competition for Development of Sg. Besi Airbase – Let’s do it right and make it public transport friendly!

TRANSIT took note of this article which announces that the Development of Sg. Besi airbase is moving forward with an invitation for proposals for the Malaysia City development.

Most of the project will be used for a mix of commercial and lifestyle amenities. Planners have been invited to participate in a pre-qualification & competition with information at http://www.bandarmalaysiacompetition.com/

Proposals invited for Malaysia City (The Star, 21 October 2011)

PETALING JAYA: Proposals have been invited for the main plan design of Malaysia City, a development at the former Royal Malaysian Air Force (RMAF) air base in Sungei Besi.

The proposal to take part in the pre-qualification of the main plan must be sent to the Malaysian Institute of Planners office in Plaza Kelana Jaya before 4pm on Nov 15.

The main developer for the 196ha site is 1Malaysia Development Berhad (1MDB).

Malaysia City is envisioned to become a new landmark within Greater Kuala Lumpur. It will include a commercial area, residences and lifestyle amenities. Continue reading International Competition for Development of Sg. Besi Airbase – Let’s do it right and make it public transport friendly!

Has KL reached ‘peak car’ yet? Will we be ready when it happens?

The term “Peak oil” refers to the impact of three very significant economic laws, namely:

  • The Law of Increasing Returns to Scale tells us that a company or organization that increases the scale of its operations & activities will reduce average costs and increase revenues and profits;
  • The Law of Increasing Relative Costs tells us that as production increases, costs will increase at a faster and faster rate until costs overwhelm returns;
  • The Law of Diminishing Returns tells us that the availability of a product will decrease and its cost will increase over time as the supply decreases and production costs increase;

Once the ‘economic peak’ is reached the average cost of producing  oil will continue to increase as the availability of oil will continue to decrease and the cost of production of oil will continue to increase. Continue reading Has KL reached ‘peak car’ yet? Will we be ready when it happens?

World Car(e)free Day is September 22. How will you celebrate?

TRANSIT has taken note that World Carfree Day is celebrated on 22 September of every year. According to the article below, this is the first time Car free day is being celebrated in Malaysia.

Actually, that is not true. Many people have celebrated Car-free day in Malaysia. Some people celebrate Car-free day each & every day. But this is the first year that two major things have happened: first, the public has experienced a car-free KL that had nothing to do with the Balik Kampung period. Second, this is the first time that the government & GLC public transport operators are acknowledging Car-free day.

This year TRANSIT has already had the experience of a car-free KL – May 9 proved to be an interesting day in so many ways, but most importantly because it showed that people can get to KL using public transport and they can enjoy KL in so many different ways without cars.

That is why TRANSIT has decided to refer to “Car” free day as “Car(e)free” Day – to remind us that our lives can be free of cares & worries if we just give up the powerful hold that our cars have on us.

We are talking about one day, free of the worries related to petrol, parking, jams, tolls, police checks, smash & grab thefts, “laptop detectors”, fender benders, organized auto-theft rings, motorcyclists knocking your mirror, etc. etc. etc.

We want to see a car(e)free KL one 22 September.Can it happen? If not this year, then what about next year (22 September 2012 is a Saturday)? If not next year, perhaps the year after? Can? Continue reading World Car(e)free Day is September 22. How will you celebrate?

Brickfields bus & taxi lane delayed until after Deepavali. Will the new initiatives make a difference?

TRANSIT has taken note of recent plans to build bus & taxi lanes on Jalan Tun Sambanthan in Brickfields, Kuala Lumpur. Originally we were told that the bus & taxi lanes would be in place by August 20th. However, we have recently learned that the Federal Territories & Urban Wellbeing Ministry will be delaying the completion of the bus & taxi lanes until after Deepavali.

This is apparently to “avoid confusion” over the lanes, and to also allow enough time to complete the construction of additional parking spaces behind the shops along Jalan Tun Sambanthan.

The 4-lane wide road, a major corridor for private vehicles & public transport, is known to be perpetually congested, partly because of vehicles double parking along the side of the road. It remains to be seen how drivers will respond to the future plan for Jalan Tun Sambanthan.

Double parking on both sides of Jalan Tun Sambanthan affects private vehicles and public transport users. Image courtesy of the Malay Mail.

As far as we know (since we have yet to see a map of the proposal) we will likely see one KL-bound bus & taxi lane on the kerbside near KL Sentral, two KL-bound lanes for mixed traffic, and a single contraflow bus & taxi lane on the  KL Monorail side, for traffic bound for Seputeh & Bangsar.

Bus and taxi lane after Deepavali (The Star Metro-Central)
Monday August 22, 2011

By BAVANI M

THE bus and taxi lane system in Brickfields will start after the Deepavali celebrations, said Federal Territories and Urban Wellbeing Minister Datuk Raja Nong Chik Raja Zainal Abidin.

Raja Nong Chik said the bus lane system would be implemented after the festival so as not to confuse the public.

“This will also give Kuala Lumpur City Hall (DBKL) ample time to complete building the 52 parking lots behind the business premises in Little India Brickfields,’’ he said. Continue reading Brickfields bus & taxi lane delayed until after Deepavali. Will the new initiatives make a difference?